hypoallergenic flowers

Flower Allergies & Hypoallergenic Flowers

Brighten up your home with a selection of hypoallergenic flowers less likely to trigger your flower allergies. Yes, there are low-pollen options you can enjoy!
Brighten up your home with a selection of hypoallergenic flowers less likely to trigger your flower allergies. Yes, there are low-pollen options you can enjoy!

Table of Contents

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Wondering if you’re allergic to flowers? If you’ve got a runny nose or watery eyes every time there are flowers nearby, you may have flower allergies.

Here, we’ll provide you with everything you need to know about hypoallergenic flowers and allergies. We’ll also talk about what may be causing these allergies, ways to treat them, and we’ll also answer frequently asked questions we get.

Read on to find out more!

What is a Flower Allergy?

If you’ve got a flower allergy, you’re most likely allergic to the pollen produced by the flowers. Pollen is a fine powder that’s produced by plants to fertilize other plants of the same species.

So if you get all sniffly when you’re near certain types of plants and flowers, it’s probably because your immune system is reacting to the pollen and treating it like an unwelcome invader in your body.

Some flowers and plants produce pollen that is carried through the air, and often leads to allergies. Other plants and flowers have pollen that’s too large or heavy to fly through the air and are generally safer for allergy sufferers on this account.

The Reasons Behind Your Flower Allergies

allergy to flowers

A bonus fact about pollen is that you may be allergic to certain types of flowers and not others. Why is this the case? Well, some plants have separate female and male flowers living on the same plant.

When that happens, the male flower (which contains the pollen), would need to send the pollen through the air to fertilize the female flower to make more blooms. As the male flower sends the pollen through to the female flower, some bits inevitably get dispersed in the air – thus causing allergies when breathed in.

But, just because you have allergies doesn’t mean that you’ve got to give up on flowers. You’ll just have to find plants that are less likely to cause problems for you.

Skip to the section on hypoallergenic flowers below for a list of allergy friendly plants you can have in your home and garden.

What Are the Symptoms of a Flower Allergy?

Common symptoms of a flower allergy include:

  • Nasal congestion
  • Runny nose
  • Itchy and watery eyes
  • Scratchy throat
  • Cough
  • Decreased sense of taste or smell

How is a Flower Allergy Diagnosed?

Your doctor can usually help with diagnosing an allergy to flowers. However, they may also refer you to an allergist to confirm the diagnosis.

They’ll usually start by asking about your medical history and figure out when your symptoms started and how long they’ve persisted for. When talking to your allergist, it’s always best to be as detailed as possible. You should also let them know if these symptoms get better or worse at certain times of the year or when you are near certain types of plants.

Then, your allergist will perform a prick test to figure out which specific allergen is causing your symptoms. They’ll pick different areas of the skin and insert a very minute amount of allergens, including flower pollen. If you develop any redness, itchiness or swelling within 20 minutes you’ll then know that you’ve got an allergy.

hypoallergenic reaction to flowers
Your doctor can help diagnose a flower allergy

How Can I Treat a Flower Allergy?

As with other allergies, the best way to treat an allergy to flowers is to avoid the allergen. With an abundance of flowers everywhere (especially during certain seasons) however, it can be very difficult to avoid. Some ways to minimise the risk of a flower allergy going haywire include:

  • Staying indoors on windy days
  • Have someone else take care of gardening and yard work during peak seasons
  • Wear a dust mask when the pollen counts are high
  • Close doors and windows when pollen counts are high

If you still experience symptoms with these preventive measures however, there are some medications that you can get over-the-counter that may be able to help:

  • Antihistamines such as Zyrtec or Benadryl
  • Decongestants such as Sudafed or Afrin nasal spray
  • Medications that have both an antihistamine and a decongestant. Some examples would be Acitifed and Claritin-D

There are also some home remedies that you can try that can help with relieving flower allergy symptoms. Some include:

  • Immediately removing and washing clothes that have been worn outside
  • Using either a squeeze bottle or neti pot to flush pollen out from the nose
  • Drying your clothes in a dryer instead of on a clothesline
  • Investing in a HEPA filter at home that’ll help in filtering out the allergens
  • Vacuuming regularly with a vacuum that has a HEPA filter

Hypoallergenic Flowers for People with Allergies

So, what are some of the worst and best flowers for those with allergies?

There are actually quite a few types of hypoallergenic flowers that allergy sufferers can have in their home including:

  • Cactus
  • Crocus
  • Daffodil
  • Geranium
  • Begonia
  • Roses
  • Tulips
  • Lilies
  • Orchids
  • Peonies
hypoallergenic-flowers-geranium
Pink Geraniums

On the other hand, flowers that allergy sufferers should avoid include:

  • Chamomile
  • Daisies
  • Common Sunflowers (though you can get hypoallergenic ones)
  • Chrysanthemums


Overall, succulents tend to be an allergy sufferers dream! Perennials and shrubs, on the other hand, are more likely to trigger allergic reactions than others. You’ll just need to look for low-pollen options to keep the allergies at bay.

FAQs – You Ask, We Answer

Below are answers to some of the commonly asked questions we’ve received about hypoallergenic flowers and pollen allergies.

What kind of flowers should I get my girlfriend if she has allergies?

There are a couple of different flowers you can get your girlfriend. Some examples are pink roses, red roses, tulips, and white and yellow lilies.

Are orchids hypoallergenic?

While orchids have pollen, they’re actually one of the most hypoallergenic flowers out there. It’s not common for orchids to trigger allergic reactions, but some very sensitive individuals may experience hay fever if the plant is indoors.

Are roses hypoallergenic?

Yes, roses are allergy-friendly! Though they do carry pollen, the particles are usually far too big to be airborne so they won’t be causing problems for most allergy-sufferers. For more information, check out our rose allergies article.

Can flowers in the house cause allergies?

It depends on what types of flowers you have in the home as there are some flowers that have a higher chance of triggering allergies than others. Flowers with smaller pollen particles are still prone to triggering allergies, even in your home.

What flowers are the least allergenic?

Some hypoallergenic flowers include orchids, peonies, roses, hyacinths and more.

Conclusion

We hope that this article gives you a comprehensive overview of hypoallergenic flowers and what causes flower allergies. By choosing to have hypoallergenic flowers in your home, you’ll minimise the chance of you having allergies – plus they do add help with brightening up the space!

Hypoallergenic Homes

Hypoallergenic Homes

The Hypoallergenic Homes group of writers include qualified professionals in the fields of medicine and science. Articles are compiled and edited by our team of writers, then cross-checked and verified by our qualified professionals.

Hypoallergenic Homes is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and other affiliate programs. We may earn income when you click on a link. Thank you for helping us deliver the best possible content for our readers.

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